uvre:

Liam Gillick
asylum-art:

 Jonathan Owen Sculptures
Started with an erasing photography parts Jonathan Owen came from two-dimensional carving to three-dimensional using marble and wood. Mercury, David and Untitled military bust are the first bold captivating works Scottish artist you may see below.
 
asylum-art:

 Jonathan Owen Sculptures
Started with an erasing photography parts Jonathan Owen came from two-dimensional carving to three-dimensional using marble and wood. Mercury, David and Untitled military bust are the first bold captivating works Scottish artist you may see below.
 
asylum-art:

 Jonathan Owen Sculptures
Started with an erasing photography parts Jonathan Owen came from two-dimensional carving to three-dimensional using marble and wood. Mercury, David and Untitled military bust are the first bold captivating works Scottish artist you may see below.
 
asylum-art:

 Jonathan Owen Sculptures
Started with an erasing photography parts Jonathan Owen came from two-dimensional carving to three-dimensional using marble and wood. Mercury, David and Untitled military bust are the first bold captivating works Scottish artist you may see below.
 
asylum-art:

 Jonathan Owen Sculptures
Started with an erasing photography parts Jonathan Owen came from two-dimensional carving to three-dimensional using marble and wood. Mercury, David and Untitled military bust are the first bold captivating works Scottish artist you may see below.
 
asylum-art:

 Jonathan Owen Sculptures
Started with an erasing photography parts Jonathan Owen came from two-dimensional carving to three-dimensional using marble and wood. Mercury, David and Untitled military bust are the first bold captivating works Scottish artist you may see below.
 
asylum-art:

 Jonathan Owen Sculptures
Started with an erasing photography parts Jonathan Owen came from two-dimensional carving to three-dimensional using marble and wood. Mercury, David and Untitled military bust are the first bold captivating works Scottish artist you may see below.
 
asylum-art:

 Jonathan Owen Sculptures
Started with an erasing photography parts Jonathan Owen came from two-dimensional carving to three-dimensional using marble and wood. Mercury, David and Untitled military bust are the first bold captivating works Scottish artist you may see below.
 
asylum-art:

 Jonathan Owen Sculptures
Started with an erasing photography parts Jonathan Owen came from two-dimensional carving to three-dimensional using marble and wood. Mercury, David and Untitled military bust are the first bold captivating works Scottish artist you may see below.
 
asylum-art:

 Jonathan Owen Sculptures
Started with an erasing photography parts Jonathan Owen came from two-dimensional carving to three-dimensional using marble and wood. Mercury, David and Untitled military bust are the first bold captivating works Scottish artist you may see below.
 
nacapito:

Sista Girls
by Bindi Cole
The term ‘Sistagirl’ is used to describe a transgender person in Tiwi Island culture. Traditionally, the term was ‘Yimpininni’.  The very existence of the word provides some indication of the inclusive attitudes historically extended towards Aboriginal sexual minorities. Colonisation not only wiped out many indigenous people, it also had an impact on Aboriginal culture and understanding of sexual and gender expression. As Catholicism took hold and many traditions were lost, this term became a thing of the past. Yimpininni were once held in high regard as the nurturers within the family unit and tribe much like the Faafafine from Samoa. As the usage of the term vanished, tribes’ attitudes toward queer indigenous people began to resemble that of the western world and religious right. Even today many Sistergirls are excluded from their own tribes and suffer at the hands of others.
Within a population of around 2500, there are approximately 50 ‘Sistagirls’ living on the Tiwi Islands. This community contains a complex range of dynamics including a hierarchy (a queen Sistergirl), politics, and a significant history of pride and shame. The Sistagirls are isolated yet thriving, unexplored territory with a beauty, strength and diversity to inspire and challenge.nacapito:

Sista Girls
by Bindi Cole
The term ‘Sistagirl’ is used to describe a transgender person in Tiwi Island culture. Traditionally, the term was ‘Yimpininni’.  The very existence of the word provides some indication of the inclusive attitudes historically extended towards Aboriginal sexual minorities. Colonisation not only wiped out many indigenous people, it also had an impact on Aboriginal culture and understanding of sexual and gender expression. As Catholicism took hold and many traditions were lost, this term became a thing of the past. Yimpininni were once held in high regard as the nurturers within the family unit and tribe much like the Faafafine from Samoa. As the usage of the term vanished, tribes’ attitudes toward queer indigenous people began to resemble that of the western world and religious right. Even today many Sistergirls are excluded from their own tribes and suffer at the hands of others.
Within a population of around 2500, there are approximately 50 ‘Sistagirls’ living on the Tiwi Islands. This community contains a complex range of dynamics including a hierarchy (a queen Sistergirl), politics, and a significant history of pride and shame. The Sistagirls are isolated yet thriving, unexplored territory with a beauty, strength and diversity to inspire and challenge.nacapito:

Sista Girls
by Bindi Cole
The term ‘Sistagirl’ is used to describe a transgender person in Tiwi Island culture. Traditionally, the term was ‘Yimpininni’.  The very existence of the word provides some indication of the inclusive attitudes historically extended towards Aboriginal sexual minorities. Colonisation not only wiped out many indigenous people, it also had an impact on Aboriginal culture and understanding of sexual and gender expression. As Catholicism took hold and many traditions were lost, this term became a thing of the past. Yimpininni were once held in high regard as the nurturers within the family unit and tribe much like the Faafafine from Samoa. As the usage of the term vanished, tribes’ attitudes toward queer indigenous people began to resemble that of the western world and religious right. Even today many Sistergirls are excluded from their own tribes and suffer at the hands of others.
Within a population of around 2500, there are approximately 50 ‘Sistagirls’ living on the Tiwi Islands. This community contains a complex range of dynamics including a hierarchy (a queen Sistergirl), politics, and a significant history of pride and shame. The Sistagirls are isolated yet thriving, unexplored territory with a beauty, strength and diversity to inspire and challenge.nacapito:

Sista Girls
by Bindi Cole
The term ‘Sistagirl’ is used to describe a transgender person in Tiwi Island culture. Traditionally, the term was ‘Yimpininni’.  The very existence of the word provides some indication of the inclusive attitudes historically extended towards Aboriginal sexual minorities. Colonisation not only wiped out many indigenous people, it also had an impact on Aboriginal culture and understanding of sexual and gender expression. As Catholicism took hold and many traditions were lost, this term became a thing of the past. Yimpininni were once held in high regard as the nurturers within the family unit and tribe much like the Faafafine from Samoa. As the usage of the term vanished, tribes’ attitudes toward queer indigenous people began to resemble that of the western world and religious right. Even today many Sistergirls are excluded from their own tribes and suffer at the hands of others.
Within a population of around 2500, there are approximately 50 ‘Sistagirls’ living on the Tiwi Islands. This community contains a complex range of dynamics including a hierarchy (a queen Sistergirl), politics, and a significant history of pride and shame. The Sistagirls are isolated yet thriving, unexplored territory with a beauty, strength and diversity to inspire and challenge.nacapito:

Sista Girls
by Bindi Cole
The term ‘Sistagirl’ is used to describe a transgender person in Tiwi Island culture. Traditionally, the term was ‘Yimpininni’.  The very existence of the word provides some indication of the inclusive attitudes historically extended towards Aboriginal sexual minorities. Colonisation not only wiped out many indigenous people, it also had an impact on Aboriginal culture and understanding of sexual and gender expression. As Catholicism took hold and many traditions were lost, this term became a thing of the past. Yimpininni were once held in high regard as the nurturers within the family unit and tribe much like the Faafafine from Samoa. As the usage of the term vanished, tribes’ attitudes toward queer indigenous people began to resemble that of the western world and religious right. Even today many Sistergirls are excluded from their own tribes and suffer at the hands of others.
Within a population of around 2500, there are approximately 50 ‘Sistagirls’ living on the Tiwi Islands. This community contains a complex range of dynamics including a hierarchy (a queen Sistergirl), politics, and a significant history of pride and shame. The Sistagirls are isolated yet thriving, unexplored territory with a beauty, strength and diversity to inspire and challenge.
algopop:

Real Prediction Machines by Auger-Loizeau
Real Prediction Machines is a data-driven approach to fortune-telling, a speculative design project that proposes that prediction algorithms, like Amazon’s anticipatory shipping algorithm, or financial forecast algorithms, will potentially be used in domestic scenarios to predict things like future arguments or family deaths. The service provider of this thing would tune the algorithm to the data needed to make such a prediction and then the user would see on a minimal device interface whether the event is approaching, receding or imminent.  A bit of a vague project, but worth adding to the algopop archive.
The project is on display at the Crafting Narrative exhibition in Ealing, London, that ends this Sunday.

"

Am I crazy? Because it seems to me like there is now a system in place that has a lot invested in you not trying to improve your life. They don’t want you out in the streets, setting cars on fire and demanding the heads of bankers. They don’t want you knocking down the gates of the white house and demanding a refund on your taxes, or an end to the wars. They don’t want you going off the grid and learning how to make your own clothes and weapons. They don’t want you running for office.

So, we turn on the TV and see mass riots in the Middle East or the inner city, and see the cops swoop down in their tanks and tactical vests. We’re shocked at the sight of a system trying to pacify its population by force, but our response to that fear is to shake our head and retweet a hashtag, while motionless, on the sofa. Not realizing how much more easily we allowed ourselves to be pacified.

"

David Wong (via nathanielstuart)

(via nathanielstuart)

the-qualified-life:

The Planning MachineProject Cybersyn and the origins of the Big Data nation. BY EVGENY MOROZOV

A bit of causal thinking can go a long way. For all its utopianism and scientism, its algedonic meters and hand-drawn graphs, Project Cybersyn got some aspects of its politics right: it started with the needs of the citizens and went from there. The problem with today’s digital utopianism is that it typically starts with a PowerPoint slide in a venture capitalist’s pitch deck. As citizens in an era of Datafeed, we still haven’t figured out how to manage our way to happiness. But there’s a lot of money to be made in selling us the dials.
brucesterling:

*Well, if you amend that to “clutching the Old Testament and consulting the Koch Brothers,” it’s pretty spot-on, Carl

priceofliberty:

Chinese authorities have blocked the online photo-sharing service Instagram, to stop spread of videos and photos, which feature Hong Kong police using tear gas against peaceful protesters, NBC News reports.

According to the Associate Press, police threw tear gas into the crowd without warning, causing panic among demonstrators and injuring several people.

Many of the photos, which depicted harsh and imprudent use of force by the police, were posted through the social media application with the hashtags “#OccupyCentral” or “#OccupyHK.” "Occupy Central" is a Hong Kong non-violent pro-democratic movement, opposing government’s electoral restrictions and demanding fair and open elections in 2017.

The information about the social media app blocking has been confirmed by website monitoring services blockedinchina.net and greatfire.org. However, Beijing censorship measures have not cut off Hong Kong from the service. Witnesses are continuing to share images of the protests, which are accessible for Instagram users all over the world.

Blocking “objectionable” websites has become a routine practice in the country. Instagram, which has succeeded to escape censorship measures for many years, has apparently become another victim under the state’s policy of Internet censorship.

Overall, about 2,700 websites were blocked by Chinese authorities in the last few years, including Instagram’s owner, social networking service - Facebook.

(via 2087)

prostheticknowledge:

Animator vs Animation IV
Absolutely brilliant short film by Alan Becker where a real-world animator finds himself fighting with a stickman on a computer desktop. A tech literate piece, the narrative is mostly non-verbal but the story is told incredibly well visually. Well worth ten minutes of your time - video embedded below:


Directly after graduating from Columbus College of Art and Design in 2013, I ran a successful campaign on Kickstarter to fund the making of Animator vs. Animation IV. I worked on this animation for a year, putting in 738.25 work hours, twice as many as number 3. In this episode, I did a few things differently. First, I included live action shots to show the reaction of the animator at his computer desk. I also included a scene where I fight with the stick figure on my iPhone. This required animating the iPhone’s screen and playing it as a video on the phone itself while reacting to it, with a piece of plastic stuck to my finger so as not to actually activate the touchscreen. I also recorded my own sound effects.

Things have come a long way since Xiao Xiao …
More at Alan’s website hereprostheticknowledge:

Animator vs Animation IV
Absolutely brilliant short film by Alan Becker where a real-world animator finds himself fighting with a stickman on a computer desktop. A tech literate piece, the narrative is mostly non-verbal but the story is told incredibly well visually. Well worth ten minutes of your time - video embedded below:


Directly after graduating from Columbus College of Art and Design in 2013, I ran a successful campaign on Kickstarter to fund the making of Animator vs. Animation IV. I worked on this animation for a year, putting in 738.25 work hours, twice as many as number 3. In this episode, I did a few things differently. First, I included live action shots to show the reaction of the animator at his computer desk. I also included a scene where I fight with the stick figure on my iPhone. This required animating the iPhone’s screen and playing it as a video on the phone itself while reacting to it, with a piece of plastic stuck to my finger so as not to actually activate the touchscreen. I also recorded my own sound effects.

Things have come a long way since Xiao Xiao …
More at Alan’s website hereprostheticknowledge:

Animator vs Animation IV
Absolutely brilliant short film by Alan Becker where a real-world animator finds himself fighting with a stickman on a computer desktop. A tech literate piece, the narrative is mostly non-verbal but the story is told incredibly well visually. Well worth ten minutes of your time - video embedded below:


Directly after graduating from Columbus College of Art and Design in 2013, I ran a successful campaign on Kickstarter to fund the making of Animator vs. Animation IV. I worked on this animation for a year, putting in 738.25 work hours, twice as many as number 3. In this episode, I did a few things differently. First, I included live action shots to show the reaction of the animator at his computer desk. I also included a scene where I fight with the stick figure on my iPhone. This required animating the iPhone’s screen and playing it as a video on the phone itself while reacting to it, with a piece of plastic stuck to my finger so as not to actually activate the touchscreen. I also recorded my own sound effects.

Things have come a long way since Xiao Xiao …
More at Alan’s website hereprostheticknowledge:

Animator vs Animation IV
Absolutely brilliant short film by Alan Becker where a real-world animator finds himself fighting with a stickman on a computer desktop. A tech literate piece, the narrative is mostly non-verbal but the story is told incredibly well visually. Well worth ten minutes of your time - video embedded below:


Directly after graduating from Columbus College of Art and Design in 2013, I ran a successful campaign on Kickstarter to fund the making of Animator vs. Animation IV. I worked on this animation for a year, putting in 738.25 work hours, twice as many as number 3. In this episode, I did a few things differently. First, I included live action shots to show the reaction of the animator at his computer desk. I also included a scene where I fight with the stick figure on my iPhone. This required animating the iPhone’s screen and playing it as a video on the phone itself while reacting to it, with a piece of plastic stuck to my finger so as not to actually activate the touchscreen. I also recorded my own sound effects.

Things have come a long way since Xiao Xiao …
More at Alan’s website hereprostheticknowledge:

Animator vs Animation IV
Absolutely brilliant short film by Alan Becker where a real-world animator finds himself fighting with a stickman on a computer desktop. A tech literate piece, the narrative is mostly non-verbal but the story is told incredibly well visually. Well worth ten minutes of your time - video embedded below:


Directly after graduating from Columbus College of Art and Design in 2013, I ran a successful campaign on Kickstarter to fund the making of Animator vs. Animation IV. I worked on this animation for a year, putting in 738.25 work hours, twice as many as number 3. In this episode, I did a few things differently. First, I included live action shots to show the reaction of the animator at his computer desk. I also included a scene where I fight with the stick figure on my iPhone. This required animating the iPhone’s screen and playing it as a video on the phone itself while reacting to it, with a piece of plastic stuck to my finger so as not to actually activate the touchscreen. I also recorded my own sound effects.

Things have come a long way since Xiao Xiao …
More at Alan’s website here
nevver:

Take the A train
nevver:

Projections, Mads Perchnevver:

Projections, Mads Perchnevver:

Projections, Mads Perchnevver:

Projections, Mads Perchnevver:

Projections, Mads Perchnevver:

Projections, Mads Perch

"Passion has little to do with euphoria and everything to do with patience. It is not about feeling good. It is about endurance. Like patience, passion comes from the same Latin root: pati. It does not mean to flow with exuberance. It means to suffer."

— Mark Z. Danielewski, House of Leaves (via easymomentsandobsession)

(via nathanielstuart)