prostheticknowledge:

"My saddest photo yet …"
Alexander Gerst, an astronaut currently based at the International Space Station, takes a photograph over Gaza at night:

My saddest photo yet. From #ISS we can actually see explosions and rockets flying over #Gaza & #Israel

https://twitter.com/Astro_Alex/status/492003157531451392
nevver:

Word on the Street
witchoria:

Wish You Were Here

"Myths are public dreams, dreams are private myths."

— Joseph Campbell (via sacredfemininegypsyheart)

(via nathanielstuart)

"

Unsurprisingly, the blame game is now playing out on Wikipedia, where editors battle to record the polemics that best reflect their side of the story. Earlier this morning, the Russian-language Wikipedia entry for commercial aviation accidents hosted one such skirmish, when someone with an IP address based in Kyiv edited the MH17 record to say that the plane was shot down “by terrorists of the self-proclaimed Donetsk People’s Republic with Buk system missiles, which the terrorists received from the Russian Federation.” Less than an hour later, someone with a Moscow IP address replaced this text with the sentence, “The plane was shot down by Ukrainian soldiers.”

Thanks to a Twitter bot that tracks anonymous Wikipedia edits made from IP addresses used by the Russian government, we know that the second edit to the MH17 article came from a computer at VGTRK, the All-Russia State Television and Radio Broadcasting Company.

"

Russian State TV Edits Wikipedia to Blame Ukraine for MH17 Crash · Global Voices (via new-aesthetic)

(via new-aesthetic)

lonelysandwich:

America’s Funniest Robots
lonelysandwich:

America’s Funniest Robots
lonelysandwich:

America’s Funniest Robots
lonelysandwich:

America’s Funniest Robots
nacapito:

Jake and the history of socioeconomic equality

netlibrarian:

In Dungeons & Dragons, characters are aligned in terms of law/chaos and good/evil. Wikipedia has a great explanation. Technology is a chaotic neutral actor.

Here’s what we’re talking about:

A Chaotic Neutral character is an individualist who follows his or her own heart, and generally…

explore-blog:

Legendary neurologist Oliver Sacks, who is 81 today, on memory and the necessary forgettings of creativity 
nacapito:

adventuretime:

Adventure Time Nominated for Emmy
Guess who just got nominated for an Emmy? If you’ve looked over this morning’s list of nominees or read the above “Adventure Time Nominated for Emmy,” you’d know the answer is Adventure Time. The episode up for the statue this year is “Be More,” and the category is Outstanding Short-Format Animated Program.
Congratulations and best of luck next month to Pen, Tom, Steve, Nate, Nick, Kelly, and the entire cast and crew.

Oh sí!
prostheticknowledge:

Cyberbeetle
Robotics project by Tomi and Kati Hyyppä with an insect that reacts to nearby audio visual content - video embedded below:


The Cyberbeetle is based on a gorgeous Chalcosoma atlas beetle species represented in the insect box scans of the Museum für Naturkunde. Being little bit of a geek, the Cyberbeetle has his own hi-tech insect box with special features. When the box is turned on its side, small doors are revealed. Opening the doors unveils a home theater with a hi-definition flat screen, audio system and infrared communication. The horn of the Cyberbeetle contains an infrared receiver, which enables him to react immediately when the TV program starts. He likes music videos in particular. The Cyberbeetle is usually a rather grumpy creature that crawls slowly and murmurs along the way, but as soon as the TV is switched on, he becomes very cheerful and dances little bit.

More Here
prostheticknowledge:

Cyberbeetle
Robotics project by Tomi and Kati Hyyppä with an insect that reacts to nearby audio visual content - video embedded below:


The Cyberbeetle is based on a gorgeous Chalcosoma atlas beetle species represented in the insect box scans of the Museum für Naturkunde. Being little bit of a geek, the Cyberbeetle has his own hi-tech insect box with special features. When the box is turned on its side, small doors are revealed. Opening the doors unveils a home theater with a hi-definition flat screen, audio system and infrared communication. The horn of the Cyberbeetle contains an infrared receiver, which enables him to react immediately when the TV program starts. He likes music videos in particular. The Cyberbeetle is usually a rather grumpy creature that crawls slowly and murmurs along the way, but as soon as the TV is switched on, he becomes very cheerful and dances little bit.

More Here
brucesterling:

https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/fb-mood-manipulator/
*Hahaha almost too easy
jtotheizzoe:

thebrainscoop:

Happy Birthday, Walter Potter!
Walter Potter (2 July 1835 – 21 May 1918) was a Victorian taxidermist most famous for his eccentric anthropomorphic taxidermy. He received fame and accolades for such lovely scenes as “The Kittens’ Wedding” (his final creation in 1890), and his Rabbit School. Potter first began exploring the recreation of nursery rhymes using preserved and costumed animals in 1854 at the age of 19, and completed his most famous work, “The Death and Burial of Cock Robin,” which included 96 species of British birds. 
With encouragement and support from his local community, Potter was able to earn a living and support his family at an Inn in Bramber, a small town in West Sussex. Locals commissioned Walter to preserve their pets and he relied on donations of dead animals to populate his fanciful scenes. The clothes were created by his neighbors and his daughter Minnie. 
Many of Potter’s works remained on display at the Bramber Inn, which was turned into a Museum during his life in order to house more than 10,000 specimens. The original Museum eventually closed in the 1970s and moved to Cornwall in 1984, before being sold and disbanded in 2003. 
Sources: Telegraph UKWalter Potter’s Curious World of Taxidermy by Dr. Pat MorrisWalter Potter Taxidermy

You say “eccentric anthropomorphic taxidermy” when you really mean “literally the best thing ever.”jtotheizzoe:

thebrainscoop:

Happy Birthday, Walter Potter!
Walter Potter (2 July 1835 – 21 May 1918) was a Victorian taxidermist most famous for his eccentric anthropomorphic taxidermy. He received fame and accolades for such lovely scenes as “The Kittens’ Wedding” (his final creation in 1890), and his Rabbit School. Potter first began exploring the recreation of nursery rhymes using preserved and costumed animals in 1854 at the age of 19, and completed his most famous work, “The Death and Burial of Cock Robin,” which included 96 species of British birds. 
With encouragement and support from his local community, Potter was able to earn a living and support his family at an Inn in Bramber, a small town in West Sussex. Locals commissioned Walter to preserve their pets and he relied on donations of dead animals to populate his fanciful scenes. The clothes were created by his neighbors and his daughter Minnie. 
Many of Potter’s works remained on display at the Bramber Inn, which was turned into a Museum during his life in order to house more than 10,000 specimens. The original Museum eventually closed in the 1970s and moved to Cornwall in 1984, before being sold and disbanded in 2003. 
Sources: Telegraph UKWalter Potter’s Curious World of Taxidermy by Dr. Pat MorrisWalter Potter Taxidermy

You say “eccentric anthropomorphic taxidermy” when you really mean “literally the best thing ever.”jtotheizzoe:

thebrainscoop:

Happy Birthday, Walter Potter!
Walter Potter (2 July 1835 – 21 May 1918) was a Victorian taxidermist most famous for his eccentric anthropomorphic taxidermy. He received fame and accolades for such lovely scenes as “The Kittens’ Wedding” (his final creation in 1890), and his Rabbit School. Potter first began exploring the recreation of nursery rhymes using preserved and costumed animals in 1854 at the age of 19, and completed his most famous work, “The Death and Burial of Cock Robin,” which included 96 species of British birds. 
With encouragement and support from his local community, Potter was able to earn a living and support his family at an Inn in Bramber, a small town in West Sussex. Locals commissioned Walter to preserve their pets and he relied on donations of dead animals to populate his fanciful scenes. The clothes were created by his neighbors and his daughter Minnie. 
Many of Potter’s works remained on display at the Bramber Inn, which was turned into a Museum during his life in order to house more than 10,000 specimens. The original Museum eventually closed in the 1970s and moved to Cornwall in 1984, before being sold and disbanded in 2003. 
Sources: Telegraph UKWalter Potter’s Curious World of Taxidermy by Dr. Pat MorrisWalter Potter Taxidermy

You say “eccentric anthropomorphic taxidermy” when you really mean “literally the best thing ever.”jtotheizzoe:

thebrainscoop:

Happy Birthday, Walter Potter!
Walter Potter (2 July 1835 – 21 May 1918) was a Victorian taxidermist most famous for his eccentric anthropomorphic taxidermy. He received fame and accolades for such lovely scenes as “The Kittens’ Wedding” (his final creation in 1890), and his Rabbit School. Potter first began exploring the recreation of nursery rhymes using preserved and costumed animals in 1854 at the age of 19, and completed his most famous work, “The Death and Burial of Cock Robin,” which included 96 species of British birds. 
With encouragement and support from his local community, Potter was able to earn a living and support his family at an Inn in Bramber, a small town in West Sussex. Locals commissioned Walter to preserve their pets and he relied on donations of dead animals to populate his fanciful scenes. The clothes were created by his neighbors and his daughter Minnie. 
Many of Potter’s works remained on display at the Bramber Inn, which was turned into a Museum during his life in order to house more than 10,000 specimens. The original Museum eventually closed in the 1970s and moved to Cornwall in 1984, before being sold and disbanded in 2003. 
Sources: Telegraph UKWalter Potter’s Curious World of Taxidermy by Dr. Pat MorrisWalter Potter Taxidermy

You say “eccentric anthropomorphic taxidermy” when you really mean “literally the best thing ever.”jtotheizzoe:

thebrainscoop:

Happy Birthday, Walter Potter!
Walter Potter (2 July 1835 – 21 May 1918) was a Victorian taxidermist most famous for his eccentric anthropomorphic taxidermy. He received fame and accolades for such lovely scenes as “The Kittens’ Wedding” (his final creation in 1890), and his Rabbit School. Potter first began exploring the recreation of nursery rhymes using preserved and costumed animals in 1854 at the age of 19, and completed his most famous work, “The Death and Burial of Cock Robin,” which included 96 species of British birds. 
With encouragement and support from his local community, Potter was able to earn a living and support his family at an Inn in Bramber, a small town in West Sussex. Locals commissioned Walter to preserve their pets and he relied on donations of dead animals to populate his fanciful scenes. The clothes were created by his neighbors and his daughter Minnie. 
Many of Potter’s works remained on display at the Bramber Inn, which was turned into a Museum during his life in order to house more than 10,000 specimens. The original Museum eventually closed in the 1970s and moved to Cornwall in 1984, before being sold and disbanded in 2003. 
Sources: Telegraph UKWalter Potter’s Curious World of Taxidermy by Dr. Pat MorrisWalter Potter Taxidermy

You say “eccentric anthropomorphic taxidermy” when you really mean “literally the best thing ever.”
nevver:

The city never sleeps